1/35 StuG.III Ausf.G Early Production, Kurks 1943 (Neo Smart Kit 04)

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Dragon is releasing its fourth item in its Neo Smart Kit range in the ever-popular 1/35 scale. The subject is a StuG.III Ausf.G (Sd.Kfz.142), of which 7,720 were produced from December 1942 through till April 1945. Early-production variants of this tank destroyer were used in the gigantic Battle of Kursk in July-August 1943. A prominent feature of Dragon’s Neo range is the remarkable Neo Smart Tracks, which include pre-molded lengths of track to make life easier for the modeler, as well as individual links that allow appropriate sagging effects. Furthermore, the plastic material on Neo Smart Tracks is the same as that used elsewhere on the injection-molded kit to make painting and finishing that bit easier. This 1/35 kit of the StuG.III Ausf.G Early Production, Kursk 1943 is based on Dragon’s kit range, but as an initial release it features a complete interior as a first-production bonus. With all these convenient features, model-makers could build an abandoned vehicle that fought in the Battle of Kursk with damaged tracks and opened hatches, for instance. This is a splendid Neo kit with almost limitless possibilities!

AFVCLUB AF35308 Centurion Mk.I British MBT 1/35

■ New Centurion Mk.I turret assembly.
■ Metal 17-pounder gun barrel.
■ All hatch could choose open or close.
■ Secondary armament ball-mounting system.
■ Secondary armament has two type could choose, 20mm Polsten or 7.92mm Besa.
■ Centurion Mk.I dedicated armored skirt plate.
■ Centurion Mk.I dedicated rear fender.
■ Centurion Mk.I dedicated air outlet louvres.
■ New storage boxes on the turret sides and hull sides.

NEW KIT IN PROGRESS 1/35 LGOC B-TYPE LONDON OMNIBUS 38021 FULL KIT AND FULL INFO

Scale: 1:35

Barcode: 4820183312761

Series: Miniatures

Box size: 386x240x70 mm
HIGHLY DETAILED MODEL
ACCURATE ENGINE
CLEAR PARTS INCLUDED
PHOTO-ETCHED PARTS INCLUDED
DECAL SHEET INCLUDED
8 OPTIONS SIDE ADVERT
3 OPTIONS FRONT ADVERT
3 OPTIONS REAR ADVERT

Design and pre-war service

B-type buses were built in Walthamstow and replaced the X-type bus. It had a 34 seat capacity and is often considered to be the first mass produced bus. The first bus began carrying passengers in 1911. By 1913 around 2500 had entered service.

The B-type was designed by Frank Searle, who was chief engineer of the LGOC. It had a wooden frame, steel wheels, a worm drive and chain gearbox. Its top speed was 16 miles per hour (26 km/h), which was above the legal speed limit at that time of 12 miles per hour (19 km/h). However the vehicle could reach 30–35 miles per hour (48–56 km/h) under the right conditions.

B-types carried 16 passengers inside and had seats for 18 on the uncovered top deck. These outside seats were fitted with wet-weather canvas covers. Electric lighting was introduced from 1912, and headlights in 1913. Before this, it was thought that interior lighting would render the bus sufficiently visible at night.[3]

Overview
Manufacturer London General Omnibus Company
Body and chassis
Doors 1 door
Floor type Step entrance
World War I service

A total of 900 of the buses were used to move troops behind the lines during World War I. After initially serving without any modifications and in their red-and-white livery, they were painted khaki. It was soon found that the glass windows on the lower deck were prone to breakage, mostly from contact with the men's rifles and packs. The glass was therefore removed and replaced by planks nailed to the sides of the vehicle.

The B-Type could carry 24 fully equipped infantrymen and their kit. Some were converted into mobile pigeon lofts to house the pigeons used for communication along the front. They served until the end of the war when they were used to bring troops home
The Imperial War Museum preserves a B-Type bus, B43, which was built by AEC in 1911 and ran on London bus routes until being purchased by the War Office in 1914.B43 served in France and Belgium until 1919 when it was repurchased by the LGOC. On 14 February 1920 B43 was inspected by King George V at Buckingham Palace, becoming the first bus the monarch had ever boarded.During the early 1920s the bus was retired from service and preserved by the Auxiliary Omnibus Companies Association, who renamed it Ole Bill after Bruce Bairnsfather's celebrated caricature of a British soldier. Ole Bill continued to appear in commemorative parades,[nb 2] before being presented to the Imperial War Museum in April 1970.

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