the 2020 Airfix Range FULL

Small Beginners Set Red Arrows Hawk

A55002 1/72

Skill 1
Flying Hours 1
Number of Parts 24
Dimensions (mm) L155 x W131


1/72 Bristol Beaufighter TF.X

A04019A

The definitive variant of the Beaufighter and certainly the one most heavily produced, the TF.X was a two seat torpedo strike fighter, known colloquially as the Torbeau. Carrying a combination of rockets, cannon and an 18 inch mark XII torpedo, these rugged aircraft attacked shipping at high speed and low altitude, often with rocket firing Beaufighters drawing anti-aircraft fire so the torpedo equipped aircraft could deliver their weapons more effectively.

Expected: Autumn 2020


M12 GMC 1/35

A1372

Expected: Summer 2020

Providing heavy mobile artillery support for Allied ground forces, the M12 Gun Motor Carriage was an effective US designed self-propelled artillery vehicle which saw heavy action following the D-Day landings. Featuring an open firing crew compartment, it was usual for these guns to be operated from concealed positions behind the front line, however, the M12 would go on to earn the nickname ‘The Doorknocker’ for its ability to blast open heavily fortified concrete bunkers during more direct actions.

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QUICKBUILD Coca-Cola VW Camper Van

J6047

Expected: Autumn 2020

The pre-coloured pieces simply push together to build an impressive model which can then be decorated with the included self-adhesive stickers.  No paint or glue is needed to make these fantastic models look like the real thing, and once completed there’s no evidence of any of the brick fittings showing.  When built they are tough enough to be used as toys, or smart enough to use as display models.  Either will show off those great modelling skills!

Included with each model are a full set of easy-to-follow colour instructions, free-rolling wheels for cars and tanks, and display stands for all the aircraft.


Best of British Spitfire and Hawk 1/72

A50187

Expected: Summer 2020

Representing two iconic British aircraft designs of the 20th century, the Supermarine Spitfire and BAe Hawk may have been developed during different eras of aviation technology, however, they are both instantly recognisable to millions of people. As Britain’s most famous fighting aeroplane, the Spitfire is still viewed as the aircraft which came to the nation’s rescue during the dark days of the Battle of Britain and its distinctive elliptical wing is still regarded as a design classic. As the mount of the world famous ‘Red Arrows’, the BAe Hawk is now unquestionably the aircraft which has come to represent the professionalism of the modern Royal Air Force and with 44 year’s exceptional service already to its name, even eclipses the service life of the famous Spitfire.

During this year’s Battle of Britain 80th anniversary commemorations, enthusiasts will be hoping to see the Hawks of the Red Arrows performing several evocative formation flypasts with Spitfires and Hurricanes at a number of Airshow events during the summer months.


Small Beginners Set Tiger 1

1/72

A55004

Expected: Summer 2020

Even though the German Panzerkamfwagen VI Tiger heavy tank saw its combat introduction back in September 1942, it is still regarded as the world’s most famous tank design to this day. Possessing a fearsome combination of firepower, armoured protection and mobility, the 88mm gun mounted on the Tiger and its excellent sighting optics allowed it to engage enemy armour at extreme ranges and certainly well outside the range at which they could return fire. Indeed, during the first Tiger engagements on the Eastern Front, the most likely way that a Tiger would be destroyed was by the hands of its own crew, as they were desperate to avoid the possibility of one of these magnificent machines falling into the hands of the enemy. From the date of its introduction, the Tiger was the tank against which all other tanks would be judged and large numbers of Allied tanks and military vehicles would fall to its gun.

Skill 1
Flying Hours 1
Number of Parts 39
Dimensions (mm) L118 x W53

Folland Gnat T.1 1/48

A05123A

Expected: Summer 2020

Skill 3
Flying Hours 2
Number of Parts 96
Dimensions (mm) L182 x W140

On graduating from basic flying training in the BAC Jet Provost, students streamed for fast jet training during the mid 1960s would probably find themselves in the front seat of a Folland Gnat and a very different flying experience. Something of a ‘hot ship’ the Gnat was fast, responsive and highly manoeuvrable, with excellent visibility from his position. In the relatively cramped cockpit of this jet trainer, however, conditions for the instructor in the rear seat could not be described as being quite so pleasurable.


Gloster Javelin 1/48

A12007

Expected: Autumn 2020

The Gloster Javelin was developed in the 1950s as a two-seat, all weather interceptor. Serving with the RAF during the late 1950s and much of the 1960s, the Javelin was the last aircraft to bear the Gloster name. A distinctive fighter, the Javelin was equipped with a broad delta wing and a large finned T-Tail. Its cannons were placed in the wing, harking back to an earlier era of fighter development, but its missile armament was cutting edge. Progressing through 9 marks in a short career, the Javelin had a troubled development, with its only action coming during the Malayan campaign from 1963-1966.

Skill 3
Flying Hours 3
Number of Parts 222
Dimensions (mm) L357 x W330

1/24 Hawker Hurricane Mk.1

A14002V

Expected: Summer 2020

Skill 3
Flying Hours 4
Number of Parts 161
Dimensions (mm) L409 x W507

The most numerous fighter in service with the RAF at the start of the Battle of Britain, the Hawker Hurricane went on to prove itself a vital and effective fighter aircraft on all fronts of the Second World War. It came to be regarded as a rugged and reliable ground attack machine, but it was undoubtedly its’ service as a defensive fighter during the Battle of Britain that forged its reputation as one of the war’s great fighters. Entering service with 111 squadron in December 1937, the original fabric wings made way for metal ones by 1939. During the Battle of Britain, the average strength of fighter command was 1,326 Hurricanes compared to 957 spitfires. It was in a Hurricane that Flt. Lt. Nicholson gained fighter commands’ only Victoria Cross of the war, downing an enemy Messerschmitt Bf110, while his own aircraft was being engulfed with flames. After the Battle of Britain, the Hurricane went on to serve in the Far East, as well as the Desert and Eastern Front.


1/35 Cruiser Tank Mk.VIII A27M Cromwell Mk.VI

A1374

Expected: Autumn 2020

Firing a high explosive hollow charge shell, the tank was used to overcome fortified positions, such as concrete bunkers and pillboxes which stood in the way of the infantry’s advance and could even lay smoke-screens if required. With its distinctively short barrel, the Mk.VI also featured a large counterweight on its main armament, which was necessary in helping to balance the gun. Approximately 340 of these specialist tanks were eventually produced, which would prove to be extremely effective as Allied ground units pushed German forces back towards their homeland. Despite their impressive speed, the Cromwells were no match for the firepower of the German heavy tanks and would have to rely on speed and stealth for their battlefield survival.

Skill 3
Flying Hours 3
Dimensions (mm) L181 x W83

Top Gun Maverick's F-14A Tomcat 1/72

A00503

Expected: Spring 2020

Maverick’s F-14 Tomcat from the 1986 movie is famed for two dramatic scenes; one when his buddy Goose is killed in a tragic accident, and the other at the end of the movie when the F-14 pilots prove their “Top Gun” worth.

Skill 2
Flying Hours 1
Number of Parts 110
Dimensions (mm) L263 x W277


1/48 Supermarine Spitfire Mk.1

A05126A

Expected: Spring 2020

The Supermarine Spitfire was, by 1940, the interceptor of choice for Fighter Command. It was capable of speeds of over 360mph and had exceptional manoeuvrability. An excellent dog-fighter, the Spitfire Mark I is seen as a symbol of ‘The Few’, vital to the defence of the United Kingdom against the previously all-conquering Luftwaffe. Along with the Hurricane, it cemented its place in history during the Battle of Britain.

Skill 3
Flying Hours 2
Number of Parts 149
Dimensions (mm) L192 x W232

Top Gun F5-E Tiger II "THE MIG" 1/72

A00502

Expected: Spring 2020

The “Mig-28s” that flew at the start and again at the end of the first Top Gun movie were actually Northrop F-5E Tigers flown by the U.S. Navy’s Aggressor Squadrons. These fictitious hostiles were finally defeated by the triumphant Top Gun aces at the end of the film, albeit after one loss during the dogfight.

Skill 2
Flying Hours 1
Number of Parts 75
Dimensions (mm) L207 x W120


Top Gun Maverick's F-18 Hornet 1/72

A00504

Expected: Spring 2020

Flying at a top speed of Mach 1.8, the F-18 Hornet is a multi-role aircraft for the 21st Century Top Gun pilot. Being able to defend and attack when needed, makes it the perfect aircraft for Maverick and his fellow pilots when responding to all the challenges they meet in the new movie.

Skill 2
Flying Hours 1
Number of Parts 94
Dimensions (mm) L254 x W189

Top Gun Jester's A-4 Skyhawk 1/72

A00501

Expected: Spring 2020

The A4 flew in the first movie as training partners to the F-14 Tomcats. Some of the most exciting flying scenes featured these stalwarts of the U.S. Navy, and their pilots endeavours helped to hone the Top Gun’s skills.

Skill 2
Flying Hours 1
Number of Parts 116
Dimensions (mm) L163 x W114

Top Gun Maverick's P-51D Mustang 1/72

A00505

Expected: Spring 2020

In this new movie Tom Cruise’s actual aircraft makes a star appearance. It’s allegedly his favourite aircraft, and this long-range single-seat fighter dating from World War II.

Skill 2
Flying Hours 1
Number of Parts 53
Dimensions (mm) L136 x W152

HMS Belfast Gift Set 1/72

A50069

Expected: Spring 2020

During the Second World War HMS Belfast saw action at the Battle of the North Cape in 1943 and played a major role during the D-Day landings in 1944. After a well-earned refit Belfast also played an active role in the Korean War from 1950-1952. One of only three surviving bombardment vessels from D-Day, HMS Belfast is now preserved by IWM and anchored in the River Thames near to Tower Bridge in London.

Skill 3
Flying Hours 1
Number of Parts 250
Dimensions (mm) L259 x W35

Savoia-Marchetti SM79 1/76

A04007V

Expected: Spring 2020

 

The Savoia-Marchetti SM79 ‘Sparrowhawk’ was Italy’s main medium bomber of the Second World War and one of the most effective bombers operated by Axis forces. With its unusual three engined configuration, the SM79 was a fast aeroplane, possessing endurance, which made it especially effective in operations over the Mediterranean. As a torpedo bomber, the SM79 earned a reputation for being one of the best anti-shipping aircraft of WWII and should the aircraft have to land on water as a result of damage sustained during an attack, the wooden wings and fabric covered fuselage gave the crew ample time to take to their life rafts. After the armistice with Italy, around 36 ‘Sparrowhawks’ continued to fight with the Germans, some wearing Luftwaffe markings.

Skill 2
Flying Hours 2
Number of Parts 102
Dimensions (mm) L229 x W33

Battle of Britain Memorial Flight 1/72

A50182

Expected: Summer 2020

 

Sharing the same RAF airfield as the Typhoons which provide Britain’s Southern sector QRA cover, the historic aircraft of the Battle of Britain Memorial Flight are some of the most famous aircraft in the UK and not only serve as a flying memorial to the thousands of service personnel who represented the Royal Air Force during the Second World War, but also an effective recruitment tool for the modern force.

Skill 2
Flying Hours 2
Number of Parts 36 / 51 / 235
Dimensions (mm) L130 x W156 / L133 x W171 / L293 x W432

Lockheed Martin F-16A Fighting Falcon 1/72

A55312

Expected: Spring 2020

Designed in the aftermath of the Vietnam War and the need to equip the USAF with a dominant air superiority fighter, the General Dynamics F-16 Fighting Falcon was the first aircraft intentionally designed to be aerodynamically unstable, making this an extremely manoeuvrable aircraft, but one relying heavily on computer controlled fly-by-wire technology. Introduced in 1978, the F-16 is still in service today with several of the world’s air arms and has become the most heavily produced modern Western jet fighter in history, serving not only in the US Air Force, but also with 25 overseas nations. This striking aircraft has become famous as the mount of the USAF Air Demonstration Squadron ‘Thunderbirds’, who have operated the F-16 since the 1983 display season.

Skill 2
Flying Hours 1
Number of Parts 81
Dimensions (mm) L210 x W131

1/72 Grumman F-4F4 Wildcat & Mitsubishi Zero Dogfight Double

 A50184

Expected: Autumn 2020

Skill 2
Flying Hours 2
Number of Parts 58 / 47
Dimensions (mm) L121 x W166 / L125 x W152

As the US Navy fought back in the aftermath of the Pearl Harbor attack, the diminutive F4F Wildcat was forced into combat against the Mitsubishi Zero, one of the world’s most successful naval fighters. With US pilots quickly learning not to dogfight with their agile opponent, the rugged Wildcat effectively held the line in the Pacific until the war winning F6F Hellcat could be introduced.

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1/48 Boulton Paul Defiant Mk.1

A05128A

Expected: Summer 2020

Skill 3
Flying Hours 2
Number of Parts 106
Dimensions (mm) L224 x W249

As the least effective of the RAF’s interceptor fighters at the start of the Battle of Britain, it is interesting to note that the Boulton Paul Defiant actually entered service much later than either the Spitfire or Hurricane, but was quickly relegated to nightfighter operations when it became obvious the extra weight of the power operated turret made the aircraft a relatively easy target for Luftwaffe fighters.

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Avro Vulcan B.2 1/72

A12011

Expected: Autumn 2020

Skill 3
Flying Hours 4
Dimensions (mm) L450 x W470

Occupying a significant position in the history of post war British aviation, the Avro Vulcan was without doubt one of the most distinctive aircraft ever to take to the skies, with its huge delta wing profile becoming almost as iconic as the elliptical wing of the Supermarine Spitfire.

Built to satisfy an extremely demanding Air Ministry requirement for a fast, high altitude strategic bomber, capable of carrying a ‘special’ payload of 10,000 imperial pounds in weight (a nuclear device), the new aircraft was intended to serve as an airborne deterrent to any future military threat against the UK, with the required specifications representing a 100% increase in the capabilities of any previous British bomber aircraft.

When the Vulcan made its maiden flight in August 1952, the Avro team were well on the way to presenting the Royal Air Force with not only the world’s first delta bomber, but also one of the world’s most effective strike bombers. Interestingly, all this was achieved just nine years since the Avro Lancaster’s of RAF No.617 Squadron had launched their famous raid against the great dams of the Ruhr Valley.

As the Avro Vulcan entered squadron service with No.83 Squadron at RAF Waddington in July 1957, Britain now possessed the fastest nuclear capable bomber in the world. It seems strange to describe an aircraft which possessed such potential for untold destruction as Britain’s most effective peace keeping asset, however, that is exactly what the Vulcan turned out to be.

Throughout the aggressive posturing of the Cold War, the Warsaw Pact nations were in no doubt that if they dared to launch an attack against a NATO member country, the consequences of the inevitable retaliatory strike would be catastrophic. Without Doubt, during the early years of its service career, nothing represented this doomsday scenario more effectively than the mighty Avro Vulcan.

Evolution of the Avro Vulcan B.2

As the Royal Air Force exhaustively trained their new Vulcan crews to provide Britain with an effective Quick Reaction Alert strike force, Avro engineers were already working to improve the capabilities of their original, iconic design. In order to ensure the aircraft continued to maintain its effective deterrent threat and stayed one step ahead of advances in Easter Bloc fighter and surface-to-air missile technology, designers incorporated developments which endowed the aircraft with greater range, speed and altitude performance. The installation of more powerful versions of the Vulcan’s Bristol Olympus engines would result in a number of unforeseen stability issues with these first bombers, which concerned designers enough to necessitate a re-design of the original wing shape.

By the time the definitive B.2 variant of the Vulcan entered service, the aircraft’s wing area had increased significantly and although still classed as a delta, would look quite different from the first bombers which entered service. To cope with the increased power availability from subsequent engine upgrades and to cure the instability issues of the original straight wing design, the B.2 wing had two defined kinks in its leading edge, well forward of the profile of the original wing design. Rather than detract from the pleasing aesthetics of the early Vulcan’s delta wing, the B.2 actually enhanced the profile of the aircraft and even though these changes were obviously made for reasons of operational effectiveness, as opposed to appearance, the B.2 would go on to be considered the most famous (and most numerous) of all the RAF’s Vulcans.

The service introduction of the Vulcan B.2 in July 1960 coincided with the availability of more capable nuclear weapons for the V-bomber force, both in number and destructive potential. It would also bring about a change in thinking regarding the delivery of such weapons, as significant advances in Soviet anti-aircraft technology now threatened the success of a free-fall gravity bomb mission. A significant new weapon would have to be developed in order to maintain the deterrent threat of the Vulcan and its V-bomber partners.

Developed to maintain the validity of Britain’s nuclear deterrent threat, designers at Avro produced the powerful ‘Blue Steel’ air-launched, nuclear stand-off missile, which would allow V-bomber crews to launch their attacks 100 miles away from their intended target and out of the range of Soviet surface-to-air missile batteries, allowing crews valuable additional time to avoid the resultant blast. Further boosting the effectiveness of the V-bomber force, the arrival of ‘Blue Steel’ raised the nuclear stakes in Britain’s favour once more and would have caused much consternation amongst the Warsaw Pact nations.

The responsibility of providing Britain’s strategic nuclear deterrent passed to the submarines of the Royal Navy in July 1969 and saw the RAF performing its final V-bomber ‘Blue Steel’ mission late the following year. Although taking on a more conventional strike role, RAF Vulcans would retain a nuclear capability and maintain their position as one of the world’s most effective bombers for the next fourteen years, before finally being withdrawn from service. Due to the affection in which this aircraft was held by the British public, the Vulcan Display Flight was almost immediately formed to operate one aircraft on the UK Airshow circuit for a further nine years, before itself being disbanded.

To the amazement of the historic aviation world, the last flying Avro Vulcan, XH558, the aircraft which had previously served as the Vulcan Display Flight aircraft, triumphantly returned to the air once more, this time in the hands of a civilian organisation in October 2007. Over the course of the next eight years, the Vulcan thrilled millions of people around the country, becoming something of an aviation national treasure – a relic of the Cold War which was held in great public affection.


1/72 Blackburn Buccaneer S Mk.2 RAF

A06022

Expected: Autumn 2020

Designed to mount high speed maritime strike operations from the decks of Britain’s relatively small aircraft carriers, the Blackburn Buccaneer was a real brute of an aeroplane, built like a brick outhouse and the most capable aircraft of its type in the world – it also happened to be the heaviest aircraft the Royal Navy had ever operated. Perhaps nothing illustrates the rugged, no nonsense approach to the aircraft’s design philosophy than its manufacture and flight testing procedure.

Constructed at Blackburn’s Brough facility, each completed Buccaneer was transported by road, on its own undercarriage, to the company’s Holme-on-Spalding Moor airfield for flight testing, a towed journey on normal roads of around 16 miles. Although developed as a naval aeroplane, the Buccaneer was also offered to the Royal Air Force as a capable strike and reconnaissance aircraft, however, at that time, they only had eyes for the BAC TSR-2 and dismissed the Buccaneer almost out of hand.

Cancellation of the TSR.2 project and a later decision not to purchase the American built General Dynamics F-111 jet led the RAF to rather reluctantly accept the Buccaneer as a Canberra replacement, with the aircraft entering squadron service some seven years after it entered service with the Navy. A subsequent order for new Buccaneers was placed for the RAF and it was decided that they would also inherit former Royal Navy aircraft, as their larger aircraft carriers were retired. Interestingly, the new aircraft ordered for the RAF would retain the folding wings and arrester hook of the original naval Buccaneers, to avoid the cost of re-development. The first Royal Air Force unit to receive the Buccaneer was No.12 Squadron at Honington in October 1969 and despite their initial misgivings, the RAF quickly learned to appreciate the many qualities of this exceptional aircraft.

Capable of extremely stable flight at high speeds and low altitudes, the Buccaneer proved to be the ideal strike aircraft to keep the Warsaw Pact countries on their toes. During exercises in the US and Canada, RAF crews regularly demonstrated their bombing prowess and the capabilities of their aircraft, winning many service accolades in the process. At its peak strength in the early 1970s, the Buccaneer equipped no fewer than six RAF Squadrons, including the Operational Conversion Unit. During the twilight of the Buccaneer’s service career, the RAF was forced to take the aircraft to war, more than 20 years after it had entered squadron service. The Gulf War of 1991 saw strike operations moving to higher altitudes, due to the effectiveness of Iraqi anti-aircraft defences.

The Tornados and Jaguars of the Royal Air Force carrying out these missions needed to increase the accuracy of their attacks and needed the support of twelve ageing Buccaneers and their laser target designation capabilities. Making a significant contribution to the success of Operation Granby, these Buccaneer ‘Sky Pirates’ provided a fitting reminder of why this magnificent aircraft should be considered one of the finest achievements of the British aviation industry.

Skill 3
Flying Hours 3
Number of Parts 141
Dimensions (mm) L268 x W186

Classic Conflict Tiger 1 vs Sherman Firefly 1/72

A50186

Expected: Summer 2020

The mighty clash of armour which followed the successful Allied landings on the D-Day beaches of Normandy held the potential to determine the outcome of the war. This time, the dominance of the feared Tiger 1 would be challenged by rocket firing Typhoons from the air and a recently introduced Allied tank on the ground – although appearing outwardly similar to the standard Sherman at first glance, the 17-pounder anti-tank gun mounted on the ‘Firefly’ was more than capable of knocking out a Tiger. The Germans soon learned to look for the long barrelled Shermans first in any engagement and to make the Firefly a priority target, however, there were so many Shermans in Normandy that misidentification was highly likely and could prove fatal. The days of the mighty Tiger’s dominance may have been numbered, but no Allied tank commander would relish the prospect of facing one in combat.

Skill 2
Flying Hours 2
Number of Parts 39 / 31
Dimensions (mm) L110 x W36 / L118 x W53

1/48 Bristol Blenheim Mk.1

A09190

Expected: Autumn 2020

When the first Bristol Blenheim Mk.I light bomber entered Royal Air Force service with No.114 Squadron at Wyton in March 1937, they not only replaced the squadron’s Hawker Hind biplane bombers, but also pointed to the future of a new, modern air force. Capable of speeds approaching 100 mph faster than its predecessor, the Blenheim was the most capable light/medium bomber in the world at that time and would be the benchmark for all future aircraft designs, including those it would soon be forced to meet in combat. During the early months of WWII, Blenheim crews would carry a heavy burden of strike operations against enemy targets, both from bases in the UK and in France as part of the Advanced Air Striking Force and British Expeditionary Force. Being relatively lightly armed and with constant equipment additions increasing the aircraft’s weight, the Blenheim was no match for the modern fighters of the Luftwaffe and despite the heroic actions of a great many Allied pilots, the RAF suffered significant losses during this period.

Skill 3
Flying Hours 3
Number of Parts 216
Dimensions (mm) L270 x W357

QUICKBUILD Audi TT Coupe

J6034

Expected: Spring 2020

The pre-coloured pieces simply push together to build an impressive model which can then be decorated with the included self-adhesive stickers.  No paint or glue is needed to make these fantastic models look like the real thing, and once completed there’s no evidence of any of the brick fittings showing.  When built they are tough enough to be used as toys, or smart enough to use as display models.  Either will show off those great modelling skills!

Included with each model are a full set of easy-to-follow colour instructions, free-rolling wheels for cars and tanks, and display stands for all the aircraft.

Audi TT Coupe

The TT is an excellent choice for someone that wants a great quality sports coupe. It offers an engaging driving experience with a touch more practicality than some of its rivals. This 2-door sports coupé with Audi Virtual Cockpit, automatic retractable rear spoiler comes with more advanced technology and striking enhancements to its iconic design.  Really a sports car for everyone!  This model comes with 44 pieces.

Skill 1
Flying Hours 1
Number of Parts 44
Dimensions (mm) L189 x W82

Hawker Hurricane Mk.I 1/72

A01010A

Expected: Spring 2020

Considered revolutionary in 1935, by the start of WWII the earliest versions of The Hurricane with fabric covered wings and two bladed propellers had fallen behind the performance of the best German fighters. Nevertheless, once fitted with 3-blade propellers, these early Hurricanes were very successful during the Battle of Britian in 1940.

Skill 1
Flying Hours 1
Number of Parts 51
Dimensions (mm) L133 x W171

Small Starter Set Peugeot 205 T16 'Paris – Dakar' 1/43

A55123

Expected: Winter 2020-2021

After the demise of the Group B era Peugeot Sport needed somewhere to rally its mighty fire breathing mid-engine Turbo charged monster 205, the T16. A natural home seemed to be the grueling and world famous Paris Dakar endurance rally and so for 1987 Peugeot entered a car for 1981 World Rally Champion Ari Vatanen. In its striking yellow colour scheme, something that seems unwise against the back drop of the desert, the modified Peugeot romped to victory, something that Peugeot repeated in 1988, 89 and 90. With Ari himself claiming the titles again in 1989 and 1990. A positive end for the famous 205 T16 a car that in group B format had proved to be almost unstoppable.

Skill 1
Flying Hours 1
Number of Parts 29
Dimensions (mm) L86 x W37

1/24 Messerschmitt Bf109E

 A12002V

Expected: Summer 2020

Designed by Professor Willy Messerschmitt, a director of the manufacturers Bayerische Flugzeuwerke AG, the prototype Bf109A first flew in 1935. The first major production variant, the Bf109E, was introduced into Luftwaffe service in December 1938. The E model was more powerful, better armed and armoured and by the summer of 1940, over 500 were in service for the offensive against Great Britain. By this time, the 109E had already proved to be a competent, if not the world’s best, fighter aircrafts in the skies above Poland, France and the Low Countries. The 109E became a symbol of the Luftwaffe over England during the Battle of Britain and along with the Supermarine Spitfire and Hawker Hurricane, it became one of the most famous fighter aircraft of all time. In the skies over Southern England in 1940, the 109E first had its shortcomings exposed. Its range was limited, with endurance over London being just five minutes. It was also unable to turn with either the Spitfire or the Hurricane, although its cannon armament was superior. It later served on the Eastern Front as well as over the Western Desert.

Skill 3
Flying Hours 4
Number of Parts 146
Dimensions (mm) L360 x W411
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QUICKBUILD Ford Mustang GT

J6036

Expected: Winter 2020-2021

The pre-coloured pieces simply push together to build an impressive model which can then be decorated with the included self-adhesive stickers.  No paint or glue is needed to make these fantastic models look like the real thing, and once completed there’s no evidence of any of the brick fittings showing.  When built they are tough enough to be used as toys, or smart enough to use as display models.  Either will show off those great modelling skills!

Included with each model are a full set of easy-to-follow colour instructions, free-rolling wheels for cars and tanks, and display stands for all the aircraft.

Ford Mustang GT

The Mustang is the only original Ford model to remain in uninterrupted production over five decades of development and revision.  Over 10 million Mustangs have been produced in the U.S. alone.  The latest GT is a muscle car for the 21st century, with not only the usual Mustang engine grunt, but also an eco-version as well.  45 parts make up this dramatic muscle car.

Skill 1
Flying Hours 1
Number of Parts 45
Dimensions (mm) L184 x W73

1/72 Sherman Firefly

A02341

Expected: Summer 2020

As Allied forces began to move off the D-Day beaches and into the Normandy countryside, they knew they would be facing strong opposition from German Panzer units, including the feared Heavy Tank Battalions. Fortunately, they now had a tank which was capable of taking on the Tigers and Panthers, in the form of the Sherman Firefly, a British designed marriage of the M4 Sherman and their famous 17-pounder anti-tank gun.

Usually deployed in a ratio of one Firefly to four standard Shermans, German tank commanders soon learned to look for the longer barrel of the Firefly and attempt to knock these tanks out first. In order to make identification more difficult, British crews would camouflage the front of their guns with light coloured paint, giving their tank the appearance a standard 75mm equipped Sherman, hoping this deception would give them enough time to get in the first shot during any engagement.

Skill 1
Flying Hours 1
Number of Parts 31
Dimensions (mm) L82 x W36

Small Starter Set Subaru Impreza WRC 1/43

A55125

Expected: Winter 2020-2021

Introduced in 2001 as a replacement for the previous 2 door version the 4 door Subaru Impreza WRC2001 was based upon the GD chassis WRX, the then current road going version of Impreza. For 2002 the car was slightly modified, with weight saving reductions and changes to the manifold. For this season the drivers were Petter Solberg and Tommi Makinen. Two giants of the WRC. While Tommi won the first round of the season at the Monte Carlo rally he had a troubled season thereafter with only two more podiums. In contrast his team mate Solberg scored one win at the end of the year on Wales Rally GB but his consistency allowed him to place third overall in the season standings.

Skill 1
Flying Hours 1
Number of Parts 28
Dimensions (mm) L106 x W42

King Tiger 1/35

A1369

Expected: Spring 2020

 

The ultimate development of German tank technology during WWII, the Tiger II or King Tiger was a 68 ton beast which introduced the latest development of the feared 88mm anti-tank gun, which was capable of knocking out any Allied tank at ranges approaching 3km. First used during the Battle of Normandy in the days following the Allied D-Day landings, the cost and complexity of these massive tanks dictated that only 489 would eventually be produced, with the price of each King Tiger equating to an equivalent cost for nine American Sherman tanks.

Skill 3
Flying Hours 3
Dimensions (mm) L211 x W107


QUICKBUILD Audi R8 Coupe

J6049

Expected: Winter 2020-2021

Skill 1
Flying Hours 1
Number of Parts 45
Dimensions (mm) L191 x W84

The pre-coloured pieces simply push together to build an impressive model which can then be decorated with the included self-adhesive stickers.  No paint or glue is needed to make these fantastic models look like the real thing, and once completed there’s no evidence of any of the brick fittings showing.  When built they are tough enough to be used as toys, or smart enough to use as display models.  Either will show off those great modelling skills!

Included with each model are a full set of easy-to-follow colour instructions, free-rolling wheels for cars and tanks, and display stands for all the aircraft.

Audi R8 Coupe

The Audi R8 is a mid-engine, 2-seater sports car, which uses Audi's trademark quattro permanent all-wheel drive system.  The car is exclusively designed, developed, and manufactured by Audi AG's private subsidiary company manufacturing high performance automotive parts, Audi Sport GmbH (formerly quattro GmbH), and is based on the Lamborghini Gallardo and presently the Huracán platform.  45 parts make up this supercar.


1/72 Bristol Beaufort Mk.1

A04021

Expected: Autumn 2020

The second in a successful trio of twin engined aircraft designed by the Bristol Aeroplane Company during the 1930s, the Beaufort is significant as the only monoplane produced for the Royal Air Force designed from the outset as a torpedo bomber and reconnaissance platform. Developed from the Blenheim light bomber, the Beaufort was ordered ‘off the drawing board’ by the Air Ministry, a move which showed great faith in the Bristol Company, whilst at the same time illustrating the RAF’s urgent need for an effective torpedo bomber.

Although initially intended as an evolutionary adaptation of the existing Blenheim bomber, it quickly became apparent that the new aircraft would look significantly different from its predecessor, with a much deeper front fuselage section housing a crew of four and the ability to carry a torpedo in a semi-recessed configuration. These modifications resulted in a gross weight increase of around 25% over that of the Blenheim and would require the installation of more powerful engines, if the new aircraft was not to suffer a significant performance reduction – indeed, the new engines for the aircraft, combined with the existing production commitments for the Blenheim would cause lengthy delays during the Beaufort’s development. With the initial contract placed in August 1936, despite the pressing need for the new aircraft, it would be more than two years before the prototype Beaufort took to the air. Entering Royal Air Force service with No.22 Squadron Coastal Command in January 1940, the Beaufort proved to be a rugged and highly manoeuvrable aircraft, although the engines continued to be something of a problem.

Initially employed laying mines in enemy waters, Beauforts would later mount attacks against the German battleships Scharnhorst and Gneisenau and the heavy cruiser Prinz Eugen, however, in the European theatre, the aircraft would operate in the main as a medium bomber. In the Mediterranean, Beauforts operating from Egypt and Malta would take a terrible toll of Axis shipping and during a concerted onslaught from the middle of 1942, would make a significant contribution in denying Rommel’s Afrika Korps the vital supplies they needed to continue fighting the desert war. Due to the weight of the aircraft, a steep diving approach was not suitable for the Beaufort and a torpedo attack run needed to commence at a relatively low, flat attitude and quite some way from the target, if the torpedo release was to be successful and not hit the water ineffectively at a steep angle. This made the aircraft vulnerable to accurate defensive fire, however, Beaufort pilots were brave and aggressive in their flying, using the excellent manoeuvrability of the aircraft to make the enemy gunners job much more difficult. Further afield,

Beauforts of the Royal Australian Air Force would also prove extremely effective in the South-West Pacific, taking a heavy toll of Japanese shipping and posting an impressive operational record in the process. Also employed in bombing, reconnaissance, convoy protection and troop resupply duties, the 700 Beauforts produced in Australia were regarded as some of the most reliable Allied aircraft to operate in these often demanding environments and were well-liked by both air and ground crews. Eventually equipping 19 RAAF Squadrons, the Beaufort was described as being perhaps the most important Allied aircraft in defeating Japanese forces in the South West Pacific region, which is some accolade for an aircraft whose contribution has largely been overlooked in the years since the end of WWII.

Skill 2
Flying Hours 2
Dimensions (mm) L186 x W244

Small Beginners Set Sherman Firefly 1/72

A55003

Expected: Summer 2020

With the American built M4 Sherman Tank available to Allied forces in large numbers, the British decided to match their successful 17-pounder anti-tank gun with the latest version of the Sherman, in the hope that they could produce a tank capable of challenging the feared German Tiger and Panther heavy tanks. Requiring quite significant redesign of the turret and with the gun mounted on its side, the 17-pounder equipped Shermans became arguably the most effective Allied tanks of the Second World War and were easily capable of knocking out any German tanks they encountered following the Normandy landings. Given the name ‘Firefly’, unwary German tank commanders who assumed this new Allied tank was just a standard Sherman were in for an unwelcome surprize and they quickly learned to be wary of the longer gun barrels of the Sherman Fireflys.

Skill 1
Flying Hours 1
Number of Parts 31
Dimensions (mm) L110 x W36
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Avro Lancaster BII 1/72

A08001

Expected: Autumn 2020

Due to shortage of Rolls-Royce Merlin engines, some 300 Lancasters were built with Bristol Hercules radial engines, becoming the BII Variant. Some were also fitted with enlarged bomb-bay doors to enable large 8000lb bombs to be carried, as well as a ventral defensive turret.

Skill 3
Flying Hours 3
Number of Parts 239
Dimensions (mm) L293 x W431

QUICKBUILD Coca-Cola VW Beetle

J6048

Expected: Autumn 2020

Skill 1
Flying Hours 1
Number of Parts 36
Dimensions (mm) L183 x W74

The pre-coloured pieces simply push together to build an impressive model which can then be decorated with the included self-adhesive stickers.  No paint or glue is needed to make these fantastic models look like the real thing, and once completed there’s no evidence of any of the brick fittings showing.  When built they are tough enough to be used as toys, or smart enough to use as display models.  Either will show off those great modelling skills!

Included with each model are a full set of easy-to-follow colour instructions, free-rolling wheels for cars and tanks, and display stands for all the aircraft.

Coca-Cola VW Beetle

The VW Beetle is an iconic car of the 1960s and this version has a fabulous self-adhesive sticker sheet full of 1960s Coca-Cola designs.  36 pieces included.


Supermarine Spitfire Mk.Vb 1/48

A05125A

Expected: Autumn 2020

Skill 3
Flying Hours 2
Number of Parts 143
Dimensions (mm) L195 x W234

Illustrating the strength and adaptability of its basic design, the Supermarine Spitfire saw constant development throughout the Second World War, with over 20,000 aircraft eventually being produced in 24 different marks. The Mark V variant was actually something of a ‘stop-gap’ upgrade from the aircraft which fought during the Battle of Britain, but with 6,487 produced, it would prove to be the most heavily produced mark of Spitfire.


1/35 Cruiser Tank Mk.VIII A27M Cromwell Mk.IV

A1373

Expected: Summer 2020

One of a series of fast and relatively well armed cruiser tanks developed by the British during the Second World War, the Cromwell can trace its history back to late 1940 and the decision to find a replacement for the widely used Crusader tank. Due to a relatively protracted development however, there can be some confusion with these tanks, as similar looking machines were named Centaur and Cromwell, with both being derived from the A24 Cruiser Mark VII Cavalier, the name given to the original intended Crusader replacement programme.

The main reason for the different names refers to the three different engine types which were used to power the individual vehicles. The A27M Cromwell Mk.IV was the most heavily produced version of the new Cruiser Tank Mk.VIII and matched the Centaur hull with the highly effective Rolls Royce Meteor engine (A27Meteor), which allowed the tank to travel at impressively high speeds. The tank also featured a quick firing 75mm gun, which was a re-bored version of the British 6 pounder gun and allowed the commander to have the option of using American produced armour piercing or high explosive rounds. Although originally introduced in November 1943, persistent problems with the new gun’s operation meant that the Mk.IV would not make its combat introduction until the Normandy landings in June 1944, where its speed and mobility would complement the Sherman tanks, which were available in greater numbers.

During the savage fighting in the narrow hedgerow lined lanes of the Normandy battlefield, the excellent mobility of the Cromwell was somewhat nullified and even worse than that, as tanks were forced to climb these steep banks, they exposed their vulnerable undersides to potential armour piercing Panzerfaust attack. The simple solution was to attach a steel blade ‘hedge cutter’ to the front of the tank, which allowed the commander to scythe through the obstacle, keeping his tank level and still able to bring his guns to bear. This addition even provided some welcome natural foliage camouflage for the tank, as long as the bushes it didn’t obstruct his gun aiming sights.

Skill 3
Flying Hours 3
Dimensions (mm) L181 x W83

1/120 Endeavour Bark and Captain Cook 250th anniversary

A50047

Expected: Spring 2020

In 1768 Captain James Cook set off on a voyage to the Pacific Ocean. The expedition’s main purpose was to study and observe the 1769 transit of Venus across the sun (in conjunction with several other observations made from different locations). However, a more pragmatic reason was to be relayed to her captain by the Admiralty in additional instructions; namely to search out the southern Pacific for signs of the yet to be discovered continent we now know to be Australasia.

Skill 4
Flying Hours 3
Number of Parts 106
Dimensions (mm) L395 x W74

1/350 Type 45 Destroyer

A12203

Expected: Spring 2020

The Royal Navy’s destroyer, the Type 45 has the most distinctive design. Her sleekly designed straight edges and superstructure free from clutter is designed to give the ship a low radar cross section – commonly called stealth features. This is reported to give her a radar signal no larger than a fishing boat. Britain’s six Type 45 ‘Daring class’ destroyers are the most advanced escorts the nation has ever built. They are designed to shield a naval task force from air attack by using the Sea Viper missile system. Their Aster missiles can knock targets out of the sky over 70 miles away if required. The Type 45 destroyers are also capable of a range of other roles and will spend their commissions switching between them, often at short notice.

Skill 3
Flying Hours 4
Number of Parts 203
Dimensions (mm) L436 x W60

1930 4.5 litre Bentley 1/12

A20440V
Expected: Summer 2020

Skill 4
Flying Hours 5
Number of Parts 278
Dimensions (mm) L365 x W145

With its front mounted supercharger, the 4.5 litre Bentley became the quintessential British sports car of the 20’s and 30’s. It was shaped from the earlier 4-cylinder 3 Litre, but produced substantially more power with its blown engine. As such, it was a stunning road car and a perfect contender for endurance racing. Due to its dramatic appearances at Le Mans and successes in speed trials at the Brooklands circuit, racing and winning became synonymous with Bentley during this period and few other models capture this image as well as the 4.5 litre Bentley. The number 9 car featured in this kit, UU5872, is the original Birkin Team Car known as 'Birkin Blower No. 2'. This is the car that made a dramatic appearance at the 1930 Le Mans 24 Hour Race.

In 1929, Bentley replaced the 4.5 litre and opted to race the higher capacity Speed 6. Three 'Birkin Blowers' were entered to compete alongside the Bentley Speed 6’s at the 1930 Le Mans. In the event, only one ‘Blower’, (Birkin’s own No. 2 car), started the race. Under Walter Owen Bentley’s tactical team management, Birkin’s role was to draw the Mercedes of Carraciola and Werner into a high speed duel, which he successfully achieved. The Blower lead from the start, swapping the lead with the Mercedes throughout the night, until eventually the German car withdrew with a blown engine. Birkin’s success came at a cost, as he had to retire after 20 hours with a bent valve, leaving the two Speed 6’s to take 1st and 2nd Places. Power: 240bhp; Wheelbase: 3 metres; Weight: 1,930kg.


Graf Spee 1/600

A04211V
Expected: Spring 2020

Skill 3
Flying Hours 2
Number of Parts 124
Dimensions (mm) L310 x W36

A commerce raider on a displacement of only 10,000 ton, she became famous as a "Pocket Battleship." With heavier armour than her sister ships she was also the first German ship to be fitted with a form of radar. From September 1939 until December 1939 she raided allied shipping in the South Atlantic and Indian Ocean, sinking nine ships totaling 50,089 tons.


Large Starter Set – Maserati Indy 1:32

A55309
Expected: Summer 2020

Skill 2
Flying Hours 1
Number of Parts 60
Dimensions (mm) L145 x W55

Named after Maserati’s two Indy 500 race wins in 1939 & 1940, the Maserati Indy was first shown in prototype form at the Turin Motor Show in 1968 with the first production cars going on sale in March 1969. A sleek looking Coupé with pop-up headlights it was powered by a 4.2 litre V8 engine with 4 down-draught Weber carburettors producing 260 bhp. It was a true GT or Gran Turismo car, able to comfortably seat four people and their luggage whilst capable of a top speed of 155 mph.


Messerschmitt Me262 & P-51D Mustang Dogfight Double 1/72

A50183
Expected: Autumn 2020

Skill 2
Flying Hours 2
Number of Parts 65 / 53
Dimensions (mm) L147 x W175 / L136 x W152

The clash of eagles which took place in the skies above Europe during the final months of WWII saw the world’s first operational jet fighter pitched against arguably the finest piston engined fighter of the war. Even though it represented the future of aviation, the Messerschmitt Me262 stood little chance against large numbers of USAAF Mustangs, which hunted the jets mercilessly in the air and on the ground.


1/76 Northrop P-61 Black Widow

A04006V
Expected: Spring 2020

Skill 2
Flying Hours 2
Number of Parts 112
Dimensions (mm) L210 x W279

One of the most distinctive aircraft of the Second World War, the P-61 Black Widow was the first US aircraft designed specifically for combat at night and the first developed with radar as its primary method of target detection. Powered by two mighty Pratt & Whitney Double Wasp engines, this was a very big aeroplane for a fighter, but if it managed to detect an enemy aircraft, its impressive array of offensive firepower would usually result in the Black Widow living up to its sinister name. It is thought that a P-61 Black Widow operating in the Pacific Theatre scored the final Allied aerial victory of the Second World War, in the hours just prior to Japan’s surrender.


Supermarine Spitfire MkXIV Race Schemes 1/48

A05139
Expected: Autumn 2020

Skill 3
Flying Hours 2
Number of Parts 118
Dimensions (mm) L195 x W207

Possessing grace, beautifully clean lines and lots of power, several Spitfires would survive the war to become highly distinctive aircraft on the civilian aviation scene either operating as Airshow display aircraft, or competing in air race competitions around the world. The aggressive profile of the Spitfire XIV made for a particularly striking air racer and helped to reaffirm the enduring legacy of this famous aeroplane.


Concorde Prototype BOAC 1/144

A05170V
Expected: Spring 2020

Without doubt one of the most famous aircraft in the history of aviation, the Anglo-French BAC/SUD (later BAe/Aerospatiale) Concorde was a supersonic transport aircraft which possessed performance that would put most military fighters to shame. With two prototype aircraft built to prove the viability of supersonic flight for the civilian market, the British Concorde 002 (G-BSST) made its first flight from Filton on 9th April 1969 and joined its French counterpart at the Paris Airshow later the same year, where they both made their debuts. Ultimately, only Air France and British Airways would operate Concorde commercially and even though only 20 aircraft were built, they always represented the ultimate way to fly and a blue riband service for the rich and famous.

Skill 2
Flying Hours 2
Number of Parts 52
Dimensions (mm) L431 x W181


Mig 17 & Douglas Skyhawk Dogfight Double 1/72

A50185
Expected: Summer 2020

Armed with cannons, bombs and unguided missiles, the little A4 Skyhawks would skim across the rice paddies and hug the densely forested mountains of Vietnam in the early days of the Vietnam war of the 1960s. Against them ranged small arms fire, artillery, guided surface to air missiles and MiG’s of the North Vietnamese Air Force. Alongside the supersonic MiG-21 was the older subsonic MiG-17F. This aircraft, codenamed Fresco, was a very maneuverable opponent, and certainly a match for the Skyhawk. Between them, they formed the backbone of the air war over Vietnam.

Skill 2
Flying Hours 2
Number of Parts 87 / 75
Dimensions (mm) L156 x W134 / L166 x W116


Canadair Sabre F.4 1/48

A08109
Expected: Winter 2019-2020

The last few months of the Second World War saw the introduction of the world’s first operational jet aircraft and with their appearance, a clear indication as to the future of aviation. Taking a significant lead in jet powered aviation technology, Germany was at least 12 months ahead of their Allied adversaries in this regard and with the end of the conflict, there was a rush to gain access to as much of this information as possible, so it could be applied to British, American and Soviet aviation projects.

In the US, the aviation industry had concentrated their efforts on perfecting piston powered aviation during the war, a decision which was vindicated through the success of the P-51 Mustang and the sheer numbers available to Allied air forces. Inevitably, this would have an impact on America’s entry into the jet age and whilst their first operational jet fighter, the Lockheed P-80 Shooting Star, was an excellent aircraft, it utilised the straight wing technology synonymous with WWII designs. With its P-51 Mustang being widely regarded as the best single engined fighter of WWII, it was not long before the designers at North American aviation applied their undoubted talents to producing a new jet powered fighter, one which would incorporate research material obtained from the German jet programme.

In their quest for ever greater speed, the new aircraft featured a 35% wing sweep and beautifully streamlined fuselage, whilst retaining the exceptional pilot visibility first introduced on the ‘D’ variant of the Mustang. With three nose mounted .50 calibre machine guns on either side of the fuselage, the new Sabre shared much with the attributes of its piston engined predecessor, beautiful to look at, but a deadly fighting aeroplane. The first flight of the XP-86 prototype took place on 1st October 1947, in the hands of famous WWII Pearl Harbor Curtiss P-40 fighter ace George Welsh, who was North American’s chief test pilot at that time.

Later in the development programme, an F-86A Sabre would go on to set a new world airspeed record of 670.84 mph, underlining the credentials of this important new fighter. On entering USAF service in 1949, the North American F-86 Sabre was not only America’s first swept wing fighter, but also the fastest fighter in the world and one of the most important aircraft in the post war jet era. The Korean War would witness the advent of the first jet versus jet combat and pitch America’s new jet fighter against the latest Soviet design, the highly capable Mikoyan Gurevich MiG-15, an aircraft which possessed a great aviation pedigree of its own and one which proved to be quite a shock for Western Powers.

With both aircraft possessing advantages over the other, this aerial duel would prove to be quite an even contest, with the more robust training and previous WWII experience of Sabre pilots proving decisive in the end. Whilst US military planners were quick to publish combat victory ratios of 10:1 in favour of the F-86 Sabre, later research suggested the Sabre’s dominance was probably nearer 3:1, though still underlining the effectiveness of the aircraft. As one of the world’s first classic jet fighters, the F-86 Sabre was produced in great quantities and went on to serve with around 30 of the world’s air forces, as well as being produced under licence in Canada, Australia, Japan and Italy. Out of a final total production run which exceeded 9,800 aircraft, the Royal Air Force would operate around 430 Canadian built Sabres from 1953 until 1956, as the introduction of the excellent Soviet MiG-15 continued to have an impact on NATO military strategies.

With the indigenously designed Supermarine Swift and Hawker Hunter still in development, the Sabre provided the RAF with a capable jet fighter at a crucial period in world history and whilst they would only see service for a relatively short period, it bought the RAF valuable time until they could introduce their own swept wing fighter designs.

Skill 3
Flying Hours 3
Dimensions (mm) L229 x W229


QUICKBUILD Jaguar I-PACE eTROPHY

J6033
Expected: Winter 2019-2020

Skill 1
Flying Hours 1
Number of Parts 40
Dimensions (mm) L187 x W75

The pre-coloured pieces simply push together to build an impressive model which can then be decorated with the included self-adhesive stickers. No paint or glue is needed to make these fantastic models look like the real thing, and once completed there’s no evidence of any of the brick fittings showing. When built they are tough enough to be used as toys, or smart enough to use as display models. Either will show off those great modelling skills!

Included with each model are a full set of easy-to-follow colour instructions, free-rolling wheels for cars and tanks, and display stands for all the aircraft.

Jaguar I-PACE eTROPHY
The all-electric Jaguar I-PACE has completed an historic treble at the 2019 World Car Awards. Not only has it won the coveted 2019 World Car of the Year and World Car Design of the Year titles , it has also been named World Green Car.

The I-PACE is the first model ever to win three World Car titles in the 15-year history of the awards.

The dramatic, cab-forward profile, short overhangs and taut, muscular haunches give it a sense of drama which set it apart from other SUVs, which when building with the 40 pieces included you will see as the car grows before you.


Curtiss P-40B Warhawk 1/72

A01003B
Expected: Spring 2020

Skill 1
Flying Hours 1
Number of Parts 47
Dimensions (mm) L134.5 x W158

The P-40 served the United States Army Air Force throughout the Second World War, fighting in Europe, across Asia and in the deserts of North Africa. While not as maneuverable as the Japanese Mitsubishi Zero, or as fast as the German Messerschmitt Bf109, the P-40B still proved to be a tough opponent. Pilots liked the fact it could often get them home after sustaining heavy damage, as well as being able to inflict it with its armament of six machine guns.


Small Starter Set Ford Focus WRC 1/43

A55122
Expected: Winter 2020-2021

Making its debut in the 1999 Monte Carlo rally, the Ford Focus WRC was the replacement for the famous Ford Escort Cosworth WRC. Driven by two rally legends during the 2002 series the Ford Focus WRC 02 found itself often at the forefront of the stage times. Colin McRae drove one of the 4wd 2000CC machines, winning 2 rallies that year in Greece and the Safari rally in Kenya. While his teammate and Spanish superstar Carlos Sainz managed a single victory on rally Argentina. But the Spaniards consistency throughout the season saw him finish above Colin McRae in 3rd place in the championship, beating Colin into fourth. The Focus WRC continued a long line of powerful and iconic rallying Fords, one that continues to today. With the vibrant livery of the car as well as its excellent looks helping it to stand out on the start line.

Skill 1
Flying Hours 1
Number of Parts 28
Dimensions (mm) L96 x W43


1/24 Supermarine Spitfire Mk1a

A12001V
Expected: Summer 2020

The immortal Spitfire was the most famous fighter of theSecond World War and one of the greatest warplanes of all time. When the Battle of Britain began in the summer of 1940 there were nineteen squadrons of Spitfires in action.
The two Spitfires for which markings are supplied represent different moments of the battle as it raged from the hot summer days into the cold winter of 1940. The first is the iconic DW-K of No.610 ‘County of Chester’ Squadron,
with its large code letters and oversized roundels that instantly evoke the Battle of Britain. Based at Biggin Hill, DW-K was initially believed to be P9495 (included in this kit) which joined the squadron in June 1940 and was eventually damaged in a dogfight with a Messerschmitt 109 in August 1940, with the codes then transferred to another Spitfire. The other aircraft is X4561, QJ-B of No.92 Squadron based at Manston, Kent, December 1940 and reflects the changes to operational camouflage at the time with the underside of the port wing being painted black as a recognition aid.
This fabulous model will show the cockpit, Merlin engine,gun ports and other great detail.

Skill 3
Flying Hours 4
Number of Parts 156
Dimensions (mm) L468 x W381


 

QUICKBUILD Ford Mustang GT 1968

J6035
Expected: Winter 2020-2021

The pre-coloured pieces simply push together to build an impressive model which can then be decorated with the included self-adhesive stickers. No paint or glue is needed to make these fantastic models look like the real thing, and once completed there’s no evidence of any of the brick fittings showing. When built they are tough enough to be used as toys, or smart enough to use as display models. Either will show off those great modelling skills!

Included with each model are a full set of easy-to-follow colour instructions, free-rolling wheels for cars and tanks, and display stands for all the aircraft.

Ford Mustang GT 1968
The 1967 model year Mustang was the first significant redesign of the original model. Ford's designers began drawing up a larger version even as the original was achieving sales success. In 1968 the “Fastback” version appeared and achieved greatness via the power of Hollywood and a famed movie, making the Mustang the must-have car of the era and still a much beloved car into the next century.


1/72 Spitfire MkVc

A02108
Expected: Autumn 2020

For many people, the Supermarine Spitfire is regarded the most famous fighting aeroplane ever to take to the skies, even though some may question how something so beautiful could be conceived as a weapon of war. A much more complicated aeroplane than the Hawker Hurricane which preceded it into RAF service, the Spitfire represented the pinnacle of aviation design when the first examples were delivered to No.19 Squadron at Duxford in the summer of 1938 and as the clouds of war were already gathering, the RAF were going to need as many of these magnificent aeroplanes as they could get.

The Spitfire’s ‘Finest Hour’ came during the savage dogfights of the Battle of Britain, where the enduring reputation of this iconic fighter was secured in a four month struggle for aerial supremacy in the skies above Southern England. Fighting alongside the more numerous Hawker Hurricanes, Fighter Command thwarted the Luftwaffe in their attempt to clear the skies of British fighters and with it, effectively removed the immediate threat of German invasion. Following the end of the Battle of Britain and a period of rest and replenishment, the RAF were ready to go on the offensive, with raids across the Channel selecting targets of opportunity and attempting to lure the Luftwaffe into combat.

The Spitfire has the distinction of being the only Allied fighter to be in continuous production throughout the Second World War and was constantly upgraded to keep it at the forefront or wartime fighter technology. Unfortunately for the RAF, the Spitfire’s main adversary, the Messerschmitt Bf109, was also continually upgraded and improved and it was not long before British fighter sweeps into Northern France brought them into contact with the latest variant of this capable fighter, the Bf 109F. Sleek and extremely powerful, the Bf 109 ‘Friedrich’ was more than a match for the Spitfire’s currently in service and whilst a major development upgrade was already planned, an immediate solution was required.

Described as arguably the most effective ‘stop-gap’ aircraft the RAF ever introduced, the Spitfire Mk.V combined the additional power of the Rolls Royce Merlin 45 engine with the original Mk.I/II airframe (plus a number of design improvements already developed for the proposed future Mk.III) and proved to be more than a match for the latest Luftwaffe fighter. With the increased production capacity offered by the new Castle Bromwich shadow factory, Spitfire Mk.V fighters were produced at a spectacular rate, with this interim variant going on to be the most produced version of the Spitfire, with almost 6,500 aircraft manufactured. Seeing service in every theatre the Allies contested the war, Spitfire Mk.Vs fought in the home defence role, above the deserts of North Africa and the jungles of the Far East.

The introduction of the Spitfire’s ‘C’ or ‘Universal Wing’ was something of an engineering triumph and not only provided the fighter with a wing capable of supporting several different weapons configurations, but also cut down on labour and manufacturing time. The new wing strengthened the undercarriage, angling the main gear slightly further forward, making the notoriously challenging ground handling of the Spitfire a little more manageable for pilots.

In order to preserve engine life whilst operating the Spitfire in hot and dusty airfield environments, the fitting of a Vokes Air Filter under the front cowling of the aircraft may have done little for the aesthetic appeal of the Spitfire and even inducing unwanted drag which reduced the top speed of the aircraft by around 20 mph. It did, however, clearly illustrate that from an eventual production run of more than 20,000 Spitfires, many would go on to operate in environments from which the aircraft was never originally intended, further enhancing the enduring legacy of this magnificent aeroplane.

Skill 1
Flying Hours 1
Number of Parts 73
Dimensions (mm) L131 x W157


Small Starter Set Peugeot 206 WRC 1/43

A55124
Expected: Winter 2020-2021

Making its debut in the 1999 WRC the Peugeot 206 saw the French firm returning to the WRC full time for the first time since the end of the group B era in the 1980s. The 206 WRC was a far more conformist beast then the mid-engine lunacy of the group B era though, featuring a front mounted inline 4 turbo engine powering all four wheels. For 2003 the previous years liveries of Silver and blue were gone, replaced by a striking red scheme for drivers Marcus Gronholm and Richard Burns. The British driver scored highly, though just missed out on any overall victories, Marcus Gronholm however blasted to victory in three events, Sweden, New Zealand and Argentina. But was beaten in the overall standings by the Brit, who tragically had to miss the final round due to an illness that claimed the 2001 world champions life far too soon.

Skill 1
Flying Hours 1
Number of Parts 23
Dimensions (mm) L93 x W41


M7 Priest 1/35

A1368
Expected: Spring 2020

With the modern battlefield demanding mobility, the M7 Priest provided the British Army with an effective fully armoured self-propelled artillery vehicle, based on the chassis of the M3 Lee tank. Supplied via the Lend-Lease agreement, these vehicles initially used US guns and ammunition, which did create some logistics problems for its British operators. The M7 was christened ‘Priest’ by the British Army, due to the defensive machine gun position resembling a church pulpit.

Skill 3
Flying Hours 3
Dimensions (mm) L125 x W65


1/72 Tiger 1

A02342
Expected: Summer 2020

When the mighty German Tiger 1 entered service during the Autumn of 1942, it was the most advanced tank in the world and one designed specifically to dominate the battlefield. Capable of destroying anything the Allies had in service, the Tiger possessed a stand-off advantage where it could ‘kill without being killed’, picking off enemy tanks before they could even think about returning fire.

Unfortunately for the Wehrmacht, the awesome potential of the Tiger was never fully realised, as it was over engineered, extremely complex and expensive to produce, ensuring that there were never enough Tigers on the battlefield at any one time. Between 1942 and 1944, only 1,347 Tiger 1s were manufactured and whilst it was undoubtedly one of the finest tanks ever produced, it could not hold back the ever increasing numbers of Allied armour. Highlighting this numerical disparity, American factories were able to produce over 49,000 Sherman Tanks during WWII.

Skill 1
Flying Hours 1
Number of Parts 39
Dimensions (mm) L88 x W49


QUICKBUILD Ford F-150 Raptor

J6037
Expected: Summer 2020

The pre-coloured pieces simply push together to build an impressive model which can then be decorated with the included self-adhesive stickers. No paint or glue is needed to make these fantastic models look like the real thing, and once completed there’s no evidence of any of the brick fittings showing. When built they are tough enough to be used as toys, or smart enough to use as display models. Either will show off those great modelling skills!

Included with each model are a full set of easy-to-follow colour instructions, free-rolling wheels for cars and tanks, and display stands for all the aircraft.

Ford F-150 Raptor
Developed as a street-legal counterpart of an off-road racing vehicle, the Raptor is optimized for off-road use, with four-wheel drive, all-terrain tyres, and an upgraded suspension system. Along with widened bumpers, the Raptor is visually distinguished by its radiator grille emblem. Instead of the Ford Blue Oval, the company is spelled "FORD" in the grille (last used by Ford in 1983). This best selling vehicle in the U.S. can be constructed with the 43 pieces in this set.

Skill 1
Number of Parts 43
Dimensions (mm) L206 x W81


Rally Car Collection 1/48

A50188
Expected: Winter 2020-2021

Three of the most recognised WRC Rally Cars are included in this gift set. All had great success in the era they competed and when built make up into superb 1:43 scale replicas that can be displayed as a group together.

Skill 1
Flying Hours 1
Number of Parts 31
Dimensions (mm) L48 x W85


1/35 M3 Lee / Grant

A1370
Expected: Spring 2020

Another tank supplied to the British under the Lend-Lease agreement, the M3 Grant proved incredibly important during the battles of the Desert Campaign, where its reliability was a marked improvement over existing British designs. With its main 75mm gun mounted in the fuselage, one drawback of the tank’s design was its high profile, which made the job of the tank commander much more difficult when engaging enemy tanks in combat. In US service, the M3 was known as the Lee tank.

Skill 3
Flying Hours 3
Dimensions (mm) L170 x W74


QUICKBUILD Bugatti Chiron

J6044
Expected: Spring 2020

The pre-coloured pieces simply push together to build an impressive model which can then be decorated with the included self-adhesive stickers. No paint or glue is needed to make these fantastic models look like the real thing, and once completed there’s no evidence of any of the brick fittings showing. When built they are tough enough to be used as toys, or smart enough to use as display models. Either will show off those great modelling skills!

Included with each model are a full set of easy-to-follow colour instructions, free-rolling wheels for cars and tanks, and display stands for all the aircraft.

Bugatti Chiron
The CHIRON is the fastest, most powerful, and exclusive production super sports car in BUGATTI’s history. Its sophisticated design, innovative technology, and iconic, performance-oriented form make it a unique masterpiece of art, form and technique, that pushes boundaries beyond imagination. Build this ultimate in supercar design in 44 pieces.

Skill 1
Flying Hours 1
Number of Parts 44
Dimensions (mm) L189 x W82


 

Revell novelties: May – November 2020

with the following newsletter we would like to show you a selection of our model building novelties from May to November 2020. You can look forward to many new models from the categories airplanes, helicopters, cars, military and ships of levels 3, 4 and 5. Have fun while discovering.

LEVEL 2


LEVEL 3


LEVEL 4


LEVEL 4 airplanes, helicopters, cars, military and ships

 

NEW KIT FROM trumpeter 1/350 USS New York Dock Landing Ship (LPD-21) 05616

product description:
The New York amphibious transport dock ship is an amphibious transport dock ship belonging to the U.S. Navy. It is the fifth ship of the San Antonio class. The warship in service. It was officially commissioned on December 7, 2009. The ship is most famous for its hull, which has about 7.5 tons of steel. It is a World Trade Center building that was recovered from the 9/11 crash. It was mainly used to make the bow.

The hull of the New York and other sister ships of the same class is very different from the streamlined appearance of traditional amphibious warships. Its functions are mainly as anchoring and landing platforms for two important combat equipment airborne landing crafts (LCAC) and MV-22B 垂直 vertical take-off and landing aircraft of the Marine Corps.

Product ID 05616
product name USS New York Dock Landing Ship (LPD-21)
Bar code 9580208056166
Product ratio 1: 350
product type Plastic Model Warship Kit
Water painting USS New York (LPD-21)
Model size Length: 595.7mm Beam: 91mm
Total number of parts 760+
Metal parts chain
Etched parts 3 pcs
Film n / a
Resin parts n / a
Total offset 29 sprues, hull, deck and stand
Publication date 2019-12
More description -The Hull is a one piece part with exception of the bulbous nose
-Detailed Flight Deck, Hanger Deck and Well Deck:
-US Marine Assault Vehicles:
AAV-7 × 2
LCAC Hovercraft × 2 and LCU Landing Craft × 1
-Aircraft and Helicopters :
CH-46E

NEW KIT FROM trumpeter 1/350 Royal Cruises "Titanic" (with light) 03719

 

product description:
The Titanic was built by Harland and Wolff shipyards in Belfast, Northern Ireland.March 31, 1909Built. In her maiden voyage, the Titanic was the largest ocean liner in the world. She was built with many safety features and claims to never sink.April 10, 1912in the afternoonThe Titanic departed from Southampton, England, Cherbourg, France, then Queenstown, Ireland, and then began to cross the North Atlantic to the intended destination, New York, USAApril 1411:40 p.m.On a clear, moonless night, the Titanic hit an iceberg and the bow began to sink. By 2am. Most of the lifeboats on the Titanic had left, but many remained on board. After nearly 2 hours and 40 minutes of collision with the iceberg, the Titanic hull broke into two pieces and sank to the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean.September 1, 1985Only to be found again. The Titanic carried 2,208 passengers and crew on that fateful night, and when it sank, it claimed 1,496 lives. The Titanic became one of the worst disasters in history and one of the most famous shipwrecks.

Product ID 03719
product name Royal Cruises "Titanic"
Bar code 9580208037196
Product ratio 1: 200
product type Plastic Model Warship Kit
Model size Length: 1347mm Beam: 144.6mm
Total number of parts 1280+
Metal parts anchor chain
Etched parts 7 pcs
Film n / a
Resin parts n / a
Total offset 19 sprues, hull, decks and stand
Publication date 2019-12
More description
-One -piece hull made from two-directional slide molds -Deck pattern finely rendered.
-7 pieces of photo etched frets for handrais, ladders etc.
-stand included
-with USB LED lighting components