airfix RELEASE UPDATE

McDonnell Douglas FGR2 Phantom 1:72

Schemes:

  • 1) XV466 D, No1435 FLT, RAF Mount Pleasant November 1991
    2) FGR.2 XV469 H 2 Squadron June 1976
  • 3) FGR.2 Phantom XV408 92 Squadron RAF Germany

 

As the Royal Air Force were looking to update their strike and close air support capabilities in the 1950s and 60s, they were initially expecting indigenous British designs to fulfil both of these roles, but spiralling development costs and government intervention saw them forced to look overseas for their new aircraft. As one of the world’s most successful multi-role jet aircraft, the McDonnell Douglas Phantom was selected for both the Royal Navy and the RAF and even though it was procured at a time of great uncertainty for the British aviation industry, it proved to be both a capable and popular aircraft in UK service.

Scale 1:72
Skill 3
Flying Hours 3
Number of Parts 160
Dimensions (mm) L247 x W162
Age Suitability 8+

Expected: January 2019

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New for 2018 – 27 NEW KITS *ALL NEW*

Messerschmitt Bf109E-4 1:72

Item Code: A01008A

Expected: July 2018

 

Scheme: Bf 109E-4 ‘Yellow 13’ 9./JG54 Hollande

When the diminutive Messerschmitt Bf109 entered service in February 1935, it was one of the most advanced aircraft in the world, clearly heralding the future of fighter design. Produced in greater quantities than any other fighter aircraft, the Bf109 served throughout WWII and was flown by many of the world’s most successful air aces.

Scale 1:72
Skill 1
Flying Hours 1
Number of Parts 64
Dimensions (mm) L120 x W137

Supermarine Spitfire Mk.I 1:72

Item Code: A01071B

Expected: February 2018

Scheme: Supermarine Spitfire MKI N3290 GR-U 92 Squadron 1940

The first production Spitfire Mk.I was delivered to RAF No.19 Squadron at Duxford on 4th August 1938 and heralded the arrival of a future aviation icon. With various upgraded marks of this classic fighter serving throughout WWII, the Spitfire is arguably the most famous fighter aircraft to ever take to the skies

Scale 1:72
Skill 1
Flying Hours 1
Number of Parts 36
Dimensions (mm) L127 x W156

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Fokker E.III Eindecker 1:72

Item Code: A01087

Expected: February 2018

Scheme: E.III 105/15 Ernst Udet KeK Habsheim March 1916

The E.III variant of this historically important fighter aircraft began to arrive on the Western Front at the end of 1915 and proved to be the definitive version of the aircraft. Produced in larger numbers than any other Eindecker, the arrival of large numbers of E.IIIs allowed the Luftstreitkrafte to deploy specialist fighter ‘hunting’ squadrons for the first time.

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Folland Gnat T.1 1:72

Item Code: A02105

Expected: February 2018

  • Scheme 1: RAF 4 FTS XS100/57 (1970)
  • Scheme 2: Oscar EW-5894 Fallus – USS Essess 1991

 

The diminutive Folland Gnat was originally developed as a light and affordable jet fighter, but went on to be used extensively by the Royal Air Force as an advanced fast jet training aircraft. Entering RAF service in 1959, the Gnat was responsible for training many hundreds of future fast jet pilots during its 20 year service career.

Scale 1:72
Skill 1
Flying Hours 1
Number of Parts 49
Dimensions (mm) L155 x W102

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deHavilland Tiger Moth 1:72

Item Code: A02106

Expected: September 2018

  • Scheme 1: XL-717 Royal Navy RNAS Abbotsinch Scotland 1962
  • Scheme 2: DH.82A A17-489 TA-L RAAF

 

Still a familiar sight at airfields all over the world, the de Havilland Tiger Moth primary trainer made its first flight back in 1931 and went on to provide British and Commonwealth air forces with thousands of trained pilots for their operational squadrons. Performing a similar role to this day, the Tiger Moth allows prospective Warbird pilots to gain valuable experience in flying a tail-dragger aircraft.

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BAE Hawk T.Mk.1A 1:72

Item Code: A03085A

Expected: April 2018

Schemes:

  • 1) XX188 208 Squadron Centenary 2016
  • 2) Hawk T.Mk.1A XX353 151 (fighter) Squadron RAF Chivenor, Devon 1983

 

The agile and reliable BAe Hawk T.1 has been providing the Royal Air Force with an effective advanced jet pilot training platform for over 40 years, replacing the Folland Gnat in this role. With over 1000 aircraft produced, the Hawk has also proved to be one of Britain’s most lucrative post war aviation export successes.

 

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Martin B-26B Marauder 1:72

Item Code: A04015A

Expected: March 2018

  • Scheme 1: ‘Flak Bait’ 449th BS 322nd BG 8th AF
  • Scheme 2: 42-96165 6B-T 'Big Hairy Bird' of the 599th BS, 397th BG

 

Overcoming a challenging service introduction due to its relatively high landing speed, the Martin B-26 Marauder went on to be regarded by many as the finest twin engined medium bomber of the Second World War, boasting some of the lowest combat loss rates in the US 8th and 9th Air Forces.

Scale 1:72

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Bae Sea Harrier FA2 1:72

Item Code: A04052A

Expected: February 2018

  • Scheme 1: ZD608/128 800NAS HMS Invincible Operation Deliberate Force July 1995
  • Scheme 2: ZH809 899 Squadron 2004– Admirals Barge

 

Providing the Royal Navy with a capable fleet defence fighter, the Sea Harrier FA2 was a much upgraded version of the aircraft which had performed so effectively during the air battles of the Falklands War. It was prematurely withdrawn from service after just 13 years, leaving the Royal Navy without a fixed wing fighter.

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Messerschmitt Me 262B-1a 1:72

Item Code: A04062

Expected: October 2018

  • Scheme 1: 10./NJG 11, W.Nr 111980, Red 12 + RAF Version
  • Scheme 2: Avia CS-92 Czech AF

 

As the first operational jet fighter in the world, initial Messerschmitt Me262s combat operations were flown by single seat aircraft, piloted by some of the Luftwaffe’s most experienced airmen. A two seat trainer version soon followed, which allowed new pilots to acquaint themselves with this advanced technology, without their conversion from piston power being their first solo jet flight.

Westland Sea King HAR.3 1:72

Item Code: A04063

Expected: March 2018

Schemes:

  • 1) 78 Squadron RAF Mount Pleasant Falkland Islands Jan 1991
  • 2) Sea King Mk.43 330 Squadron Royal Norwegian Air Force 1996

 

As one of the highest profile aircraft in Royal Air Force history, the Westland Sea King HAS.3 served in the Search and Rescue role for almost 38 years, saving countless lives over this period and earning the admiration of a grateful British public. Possessing impressive endurance and all-weather flying capability, the stable and reliable Sea King allowed crews to carry out rescue missions in some of the most challenging flying conditions imaginable.

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English Electric Lightning F6 1:72

Item Code: A05042A

Expected: June 2018

  • Scheme 1: XS903 5 Squadron RAF Binbrook
  • Scheme 2: XS921 56 Squadron June 1976

 

As the only all-British built Mach 2 plus capable fighter aircraft, the English Electric Lightning occupies a unique place in aviation history and remains one of the finest achievements of the British aviation industry. Possessing incredible performance, this Cold War warrior entered service in 1960 and became Britain’s primary interceptor for the following two decades.

Scale 1:72
Skill 2
Flying Hours 1
Number of Parts 92
Dimensions (mm) L235 x W148

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Messerschmitt Bf109E-4/E-1 1:48

Item Code: A05120B

Expected: September 2018

  • Scheme 1: Franz Von Werra 1940
  • Scheme 2: G9 + JM III./NJG 1
  • Scheme 3: Yugoslavian Air Force L-33

 

As the battle hardened Bf109 fighter pilots of the Luftwaffe began operations against Britain following the Dunkirk evacuation, they would be at a disadvantage for the first time. With only enough fuel for limited time over England, any mechanical issue or damage during combat would result in their capture at best, but certainly an end to their war

Scale 1:48
Skill 3
Flying Hours 2
Number of Parts 107
Dimensions (mm) L183 x W205

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North American F-51D Mustang 1:48

Item Code: A05136

Expected: July 2018

  • Scheme 1: ‘Rotation Blues’ 67th FBS Korea
  • Scheme 2: F51D 77 Squadron RAAF Korea 1951
  • Scheme 3: J26 Mustang, Swedish Air Force

 

As arguably the finest fighter aircraft of WWII, the Mustang went on to be selected as the USAF primary piston engined fighter after the war, with all other types relegated to secondary roles, or withdrawn from service. The re-designation of USAF aircraft in 1948 saw the P for Pursuit change to F for Fighter, resulting in the Mustang becoming a North American F-51D

Scale 1:48
Skill 3
Flying Hours 3
Number of Parts 147
Dimensions (mm) L205 x W236

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North American Mustang Mk.IV 1:48

Item Code: A05137

Expected: December 2018

  • Scheme 1: KM272 ‘Dooleybird’ 19 Squadron RAF 1945
  • Scheme 2: KH676/CV-A Flg Off A F Lane, 3 Squadron RAAF Cervia Italy, April 1945

 

As the North American Mustang was developed as a direct result of a British Air Ministry requirement, it is somehow fitting that the RAF and Commonwealth air forces used the aircraft extensively during WWII. The British designation for the later P-51D version was Mustang IV, with the Dallas built P-51K, which used a different Aeroproducts propeller, referred to as the Mustang IVa.

 

Produced under licensed. Boeing, Douglas, McDonnell Douglas, North American Aviation, A-4 Skyhawk, AH-64 Apache Longbow, B-17 Flying Fortress, B-25 Mitchell, C-47, DC-3, F-4 Phantom, P-51 Mustang their distinctive logos, product markings, and trade dress are all trademarks of The Boeing Company.

Scale 1:48
Skill 2
Flying Hours 2
Number of Parts 122
Dimensions (mm) L231 x W244

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Avro Lancaster B.I/B.III 1:72

Item Code: A08013A

Expected: August 2018

  • Scheme 1: R5868 S-Sugar 467 Squadron RAAF
  • Scheme 2: LM624 57 Squadron

 

As the third of Britain’s four engined heavy bombers to enter RAF service during WWII, the Avro Lancaster proved to be an exceptional aircraft, possessing a large unobstructed bomb bay, which allowed it to carry some of the largest bombs of the war. At least thirty five Lancasters managed to complete an astonishing 100 missions or more and are referred to by historians and enthusiasts as the ‘Lancaster Centurions’, an exclusive group of extremely hard working bombers.

Scale 1:72
Skill 3
Flying Hours 3
Number of Parts 234
Dimensions (mm) L294 x W432

Douglas Dakota MKIII RAF Edition 1:72

Item Code: A08015A

Expected: July 2018

  • Scheme 1: KN452 RAF Khormaksar 1967
  • Scheme 2: KG523 ‘H’ 267 Squadron RAF

 

As one of the most important aircraft of the Second World War, the Douglas C-47 Skytrain was the military version of the exceptional DC-3 civilian airliner and was described by General Dwight D Eisenhower as one of the ‘Four Tools of Victory’ that helped the Allied forces prevail during WWII. Used extensively by the Royal Air Force, almost 2,000 aircraft transformed Britain’s ability to move troops, equipment and supplies by air.

Scale 1:72
Skill 3
Flying Hours 3
Number of Parts 145
Dimensions (mm) L273 x W400

Vickers Wellington Mk.IC 1:72

Item Code: A08019

Expected: May 2018

New Tooling

Britain’s bomber force at the beginning of the Second World War only consisted of around 300 aircraft and was made up of both light and medium bomber squadrons.  The most capable medium bomber of the day was the twin-engined Vickers Wellington, which first flew 1936 and entered RAF service with No.99 Squadron at Mildenhall in October 1938. The production aircraft bore little resemblance to the prototype aircraft and compared to contemporary medium bombers already in service, the Wellington appeared to be much more advanced in design and an aircraft to be feared by any potential enemy.  Its sleek monoplane design and heavy defensive armament placed the new Wellington as one of the most advanced and capable medium bombers in the world.

Perhaps the most significant feature of the Wellingtons design was the adoption of a geodetic construction method, which was developed by famous British engineer and inventor Barnes Wallis. Duralumin W-beams were used to form a metal lattice-work construction on to which wooden battens would be screwed, which would then allow the doped fabric outer skin of the aircraft to be attached. The resultant fuselage was relatively light in weight but possessed great strength and whilst this method of construction posed challenges for companies engaged in manufacturing Wellington bombers, the inherent strength of the design would prove crucial when the aircraft was thrust into combat. Capable of withstanding significant battle damage, numerous RAF Wellingtons managed to bring their crews back home, when other bombers would have failed to do so.